My Best Blogs and Books on Writing by Janice L Dick

My Best Blogs and Books on Writing There are many and varied writing helps online and on bookshelves these days, but a few have become favourites of mine. Highest on my list of writing blogs is livewritethrive.com by C.S. Lakin. Suzanne Lakin publishes weekly posts on every aspect of writing. There are novel-writing checklists, free Read More

Resurrection Writes by Brenda J Wood

Resurrection Writes Do you have piles of old manuscripts previously rejected by you, your mother, or an agent? Don’t stuff them into the garbage. Instead, give them another chance by trying them out in the recycle pile. Never let them go, but instead, re-purpose them like your old jeans, which you can make into shorts, Read More

Some of the Best Books and Blogs on Writing by Pamela Mytroen

Some of the Best Books and Blogs on Writing

It’s easy to get overwhelmed with blogs on writing. I finally had to narrow my focus. The two blogs I stick with are The Write Practice and Novel Rocket.

The Write Practice was founded in 2011 by Joe Bunting with the purpose of helping writers practice. Like he says on his blog, the professionals in every field practice.

“Because Michael Jordan practiced. Joshua Bell practices. Tiger Woods practiced. He took his first swing when he was two years old. Bill Gates practiced. Pablo Picasso practiced. He started painting when he was seven.”

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5 Fixes for Your Fears by Steph Beth Nickel

5 Fixes for Your Fears

I can relate to the following five fears. Maybe you can too.

FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)

This is the reason my bookshelves are bowing under the weight of skills development and reference books and my inbox is bursting with countless links to the online courses I’ve purchased.

These materials are great—if we use them. I have to admit some of the items I purchase are outdated before I get around to reading them and implementing what I’ve learned. Not good!

Fixes

  1. Narrow your focus. (If you have eclectic interests like I do, this can be a challenge.)
  2. Set aside regular time to learn something new that pertains to your chosen area.
  3. Make sure the information you’re learning is current and relevant.
  4. Implement what you’re learning.
  5. Impose a spending freeze until you’ve gotten a handle on steps 1-4.

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5 Top Writing Fears by Janice L Dick

We all have fears and insecurities as writers. If we don’t, we may be in denial. I created a list of my five top writing fears. Yours may differ in the order or the content, but you may also find some that match.

“A writer is a person for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people.”

—Thomas Mann

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The Soup of Writing by Brenda J Wood

The Soup of Writing “So it’s writing time again,” I tell myself. I’ve been whispering it for weeks now. Today I shout it. Nobody is listening and that includes me. Surely I am not alone. Surely one or two of you have experienced the dreaded dry spell of summer and perhaps even fall and winter. Read More

Two All-Time Favourites for Back to Writers’ School by Tracy Krauss

Two All-Time Favourite for Back to Writers’ School

I love learning. I’ve read tons of books on writing craft and marketing books, as well as taken several online courses. There are many good options out there, but to save on space (lest I overwhelm with too many good options) I’ve narrowed it down to my two absolute favourites.

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The Write Course for You by Violet Nesdoly

The Write Course for You

Violet’s post got lost in the shuffle. I missed posting it last week but wanted to share it with you today. Enjoy!

The Write Course for You

The streams of kids returning to school in September draw our attention to education. This month we’re falling right in line by discussing writing courses we’ve taken. Several stand out for me.

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Course Overload by Steph Beth Nickel

Course Overload

I have a tough time passing up a deal … especially on writing and writing-related courses.

How about you?

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3 Tips to Filling the Idea Bank by Janice L Dick

3 Tips to Filling the Idea Bank

Where do our ideas come from? Best answer: everywhere.

I’m visiting with friends and someone mentions a strange circumstance that intrigues me. Or talks about a quirky character they met. Or refers to a larger-than-life experience they read about online. These are all fodder for the idea mill.

First lesson: Be observant. Listen. Imagine how this or that can be recreated in our writing.

Sometimes good ideas slip away on me because I’m not convinced they are novel-worthy. Can I build an entire book around a particular idea? Will it really fit into my plan without messing it up? Perfectionist tendencies show up and may need to be squelched in order to give the brain free reign to imagine the possibilities.

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