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Write using your 5 senses — Ruth L. Snyder

Write using your 5 senses — Ruth L. Snyder

A phrase we hear often as writers is “Show, don’t tell.” One way we can do this more effectively is to include descriptions using all five senses. “Sensory words paint vivid pictures that relate to the five senses: sight, smell, hearing, touch and taste. In fiction, non-fiction and poetry, they serve as a type of shorthand to evoke memories or feelings

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On Writer’s Block: Help for writers who need it — Carolyn Wilker

On Writer’s Block: Help for writers who need it — Carolyn Wilker

Have you ever had a day that you couldn’t write? When the blank computer screen seems to taunt you? You’re not alone. Books and articles have been written on the topic, telling writers how to break free of it and what to do when it hits.

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Write what you know — Nikki Rosen

Write what you know — Nikki Rosen

I’ve heard it said many times….’write what you know.’ Writing what we know can be a good springboard for developing stories that have impact. It’s what Harper Lee did. She penned one book – one book only – but that one book, To Kill a Mockingbird, has been read and reread and even made into a movie. Harper Lee grew

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News Release Basics for Writers — Ruth L. Snyder

News Release Basics for Writers — Ruth L. Snyder

Any writer who is working on marketing a book or other product should know some basics about news releases. For a quick overview, check out

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How to Run a Leaving a Legacy of God-Stories Workshop — Jack Popjes

How to Run a Leaving a Legacy of God-Stories Workshop — Jack Popjes

Start by introducing yourself as presenter, pass out paper and pencils, and quickly go over the Goal and Outline of the Workshop. The Workshop will take about 45 minutes to 1 hour depending on the number of participants, and the level of their participation. The Goal is to learn what God-stories are, and how to gather the facts

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10 Twitter Resources for Writers — Ruth L. Snyder

10 Twitter Resources for Writers — Ruth L. Snyder

Now that you know the basics of Twitter you’re ready to dive in deeper. There are many topics we could discuss about Twitter. However, each writer has different reasons for using Twitter which will affect what he or she wants to learn. Here are some resources I’ve found helpful.

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Stay in the Cave: Extended Metaphors — Pam Mytroen

Stay in the Cave: Extended Metaphors — Pam Mytroen

We drove past many huge billboards for caves in the Black Hills, South Dakota, but until we explored one, I would have never known how cool and tingly my skin felt at 48 degrees in the cave when it was a scorching 96 degrees outside. That’s what writing an extended metaphor is like.

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The Value of a Dictionary — Carolyn Wilker

The Value of a Dictionary — Carolyn Wilker

When did you last open a dictionary? Was it to make sure you`ve spelled a word correctly? To check the meaning of a word you didn’t know? Or to make sure it was the right word for the context. If you didn’t have a dictionary on your desk, did you search an online dictionary

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3 Sweet Tips for Creating Delicious Headlines — Pam Mytroen

3 Sweet Tips for Creating Delicious Headlines — Pam Mytroen

Cherry on top or the whole sundae? Jeff Goins, writer, weighs in heavily on the power of a headline: “So often, the headline is the most neglected part of writing an article. People (writers) just gloss over it without taking much time to consider it. In their minds, it’s the cherry on top. No, Friends. It’s not. The headline is

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3 Editing Tips to Eliminate Extra Words — Carolyn Wilker

3 Editing Tips to Eliminate Extra Words — Carolyn Wilker

You’ve looked through the guidelines and editor’s notes a second time after researching, outlining and writing the article, and you realize there’s one thing you missed, or forgotten. There are at least a hundred more words than the editor wants.

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